Patient Safety in the Dental Office

Is your dental practice as safe as it could be? In this blog series, we’ll be discussing several ways dentists can enhance patient safety in the dental office.Part I of II

Is your dental practice as safe as it could be? In this blog series, we’ll be discussing several ways dentists can enhance patient safety in the dental office.

This past December, we attended the Vancouver & District Dental Society’s Midwinter Clinic. While we were there, we showcased our AEDs, promoted our education courses and supported Dr. Jamie Renwick, one of our physician consultants and instructors, on his presentation about the practical management of life threatening dental emergencies.

Dr. Renwick’s presentation was engaging and provided dentists with key information to enhance the safety of their practice. Dozens of dentists visited our booth afterwards and inquired about the purchase of an AED for their clinic and the specialized training courses we can provide. In response of the positive feedback and in anticipation of the Pacific Dental Conference, we wanted to share some of the key points from Dr. Renwick’s presentation to build awareness for both dentists and their patients.

As Dr. Renwick mentioned in his presentation, life threatening injuries aren’t common in the dental office, but they do happen.  With this in mind, below are some best practices to developing an effective response to medical emergencies in the dental office.

1. Know your patients

Knowing your patients’ medical histories will help you make better decisions in critical situations –update them at each visit.

2. Anxiety reduction

Anxiety is a major factor causing medical emergencies in the dental office – syncope, panic attacks, asthma, and angina can all be precipitated by anxiety.  Attempt to identify anxious patients and try to reduce the waiting times prior to any procedure.  For many patients, providing detailed explanations of procedures may reduce anxiety.

3. Prepare and Practice for Emergencies

All staff members should be trained in Basic Life Support (BLS) – this includes the use of an Automatic External Defibrillator – more on this later.  It’s always a good idea if staff takes BLS together; learning to respond to an emergency as a team is crucial to optimal patient outcomes. Consider developing formal emergency response policies and posting response process algorithms in visible areas –this will help keep response procedures fresh in everyone’s mind.  Lastly, don’t forget to rehearse and practice emergency response simulations with your entire staff at least every 2 years.

Life Support Education

4. Assemble a Resuscitation Kit

Having all essential drugs and equipment in one place will save time and keep you organized when you’re responding to an emergency situation – it will also help keep you calm.  Consider including items such as an Epinephrine auto-injector, Ventolin inhalers, and H1/H2 blockers.

5. Lifesaving Equipment

AEDs are everywhere these days and many dentists are opting to have one in their office for cardiac emergencies; many US states have mandated that dentists have an AED in their facility.  Similarly, the College of Dental Surgeons of BC proposed new changes to policy regulating the practice of minimal and moderate sedation for dentists in BC.  One of these proposed changes called for a mandatory installation of AEDs in dental facilities providing certain procedures. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) affects all ages and for every minute that lapses before defibrillation, your patients’ survival rates will decrease by 10% – consider purchasing an AED for your office to give patients the best chance for survival.

Conclusion

As life expectancy increase, dentists are treating a growing number of medically compromised patients, increasing the likelihood of a medical emergency during treatment; what’s more, is that emergencies like SCA can happen to anyone at any time.  Enhancing the safety of your practice through improved policy, training, and equipment will ensure you and your staff respond to medical emergencies with the best versions of yourselves.

As a leading provider of AEDs, medical education, and medical equipment, we’re confident that taking the steps to enhance the safety of your practice is an investment that will pay returns to both your business and your patients.

For more information about AEDs, contact Julie Turley or Gwen DonaldsonFor more information about medical education, contact Melissa Palinkas.

In our next post, we’ll be discussing medical diagnostic equipment in the dental office.

 

 

Looking Back on our First Year as Iridia Medical

Brand Launch

This month marks a very special anniversary in our company’s history – being one year since we re-branded from Global Medical Services to Iridia Medical. 

Many of you lived some of that journey with us as we shared with you the triumphs and challenges associated with changing to a new brand identity and bringing that identity to life through new marketing materials, a new website and Social Media presence, new building signage, documents, email addresses, and so on.  The sheer amount of work involved in the re-brand was staggering and could not have been achieved without the collective efforts of the Iridia team and others with whom we engaged throughout the journey. 

So what has our first year as Iridia Medical involved?

We kicked off our year under our new brand with the deployment of our Mobile Medical Unit into a remote oil and gas camp in Northeastern BC.  This has been one of our most innovative projects to date and is an industry first in British Columbia. It allows ill and injured workers in these remote camps to receive, in many cases, definitive medical care which enables them to stay in camp and avoid the hazards of transport to another medical facility; particularly at certain times of the year when extreme weather conditions can make emergency evacuation close to impossible.

We also saw Iridia named as a key partner in two public access to defibrillation (PAD) programs – the BC Heart and Stroke PAD Program and the National AED Program Federal Initiative. The BC initiative will see 450 AEDs and associated training delivered to communities throughout BC.  The national program will see a targeted 3,000 AEDs distributed to recreational facilities, mostly arenas, across the country.  The initiative will also see 30,000 people trained in the use of AEDs.  Iridia is a key distributor for each of these programs and we are proud to be involved with these life-saving initiatives.

In recognition of the growth we have achieved in the past few years, Iridia was again named one of Business in Vancouver’s top 100 fastest growing companies for the third year running.  We were also proud to have been included in PROFIT Magazine’s list of Canada’s Top 500 Growing Companies for 2013. 

Finally, our commitment to health and wellness continued throughout the year with, most notably, our participation in the Global Corporate Challenge (GCC).  This program is designed to “get the world moving” and that is, in fact, what occurred with 37,432 teams (that’s 262,000 people!) from around the world participating in the 2013 GCC program.  21 of Iridia’s staff participated and some incredible accomplishments were achieved during the 4 months of the program.

Our First Year

The above highlights are just a select few of the key accomplishments we’ve achieved during our first year as Iridia Medical which has certainly been an exciting and action-packed one!  Looking forward, we are energized by the goals we have set for ourselves including expanding our remote medical services program both within and beyond BC, and building on our education and AED programs.  Stay tuned for more!

 

 

Enhancing First Responder SkillSets: EpiPens

Fire Fighter FIrst Responder LicenseIn this blog series, we’re going to discuss how we’ve helped many British Columbia fire departments enhance their patient care skills in order to provide better care in the field.

Firefighters are often the first emergency response personnel on the scene of an emergency, but are not permitted to use certain medical devices, like an epi auto-injector.   When there are BC Ambulance service delays or firefighters find themselves in remote rescue scenarios, it is beneficial to the patient if firefighters have the skills to assist patients to use life-saving medications.   This is why Iridia Medical continues to support first responders improving their patient care skills.

These days, firefighters can be in direct contact with BCAS dispatchers – key information about a patient’s condition can be immediately communicated between both parties.  This removes ambiguity and allows the BCAS to monitor and guide firefighters on how to best assist a patient with their Epi-pen.  With this enhanced communication and improved skillsets, firefighters are able to provide better patient care.   “We have taken an active role in providing this training because it is the right thing to do for patients” says Dr. Allan Holmes, Founder of Iridia Medical.  “What kind of care would you want a loved one to receive during a severe allergic reaction?” is the logic behind offering epi-pen training.

Today’s example will look at how Epinephrine Auto-injectors can positively impact patient outcomes.

Epinephrine Auto-injector

Considerable educational efforts have been undertaken so that teachers, coaches, and babysitters feel confident administering epi auto-injectors.  Unfortunately, firefighters with first responder licenses are not provided the same discretion.

Iridia has been actively supporting and training fire first responders to assist patients with administering their epi auto-injectors in emergency situations.  We support fire first responders enhancing their patient care skillset because:

  • Fire first responders are often first on the scene of a medical emergency – waiting several minutes for an ambulance to administer an epi auto-injector could negatively impact the patient.
  • Currently, fire first responders and BCAS can only administer oxygen to a patient they believe is having an allergic reaction – there is no provision in their current  training program to instruct FR on how  to assist a patient with an epi auto-injector.

epi pen auto injector

In the best case scenario, the patient is lucid enough to administer their epi auto-injector.  However, if a patient is panicking and can’t self-administer the medication (or has fallen unconscious), Iridia has trained first responders to act.  Our epi auto-injector program teaches first responders how to recognize allergic reaction indicators as well as when and how an epi-pen should be used[1]; and just as important, when it should not be used – skills we believe every first responder should know.

During a serious allergic reaction every second counts.  Delaying the administration of epinephrine can have serious consequences.  Providing first responders the discretion to assist and administer epi auto-injectors when they arrive on the scene of an allergic reaction emergency has the potential to significantly improve a patient’s outcome and reduces the potential for a sometimes fatal outcome.  

[1] Upon patient consent and oversight support from BCAS dispatch.

We Can Help Enhance Your First Responder Skills

Enhancing patient care skills requires coordinating many moving parts.  Training, equipment, and a medical oversight framework need to be considered.  In addition, it’s important that fire departments understand current regulations and the limitations of their current first responder license.  Over the past decade, Iridia Medical has successfully assisted fire departments of all sizes in implementing Epi auto-injector, pulse oximeter, and blood pressure measurement programs.

To learn more, contact Jason Bradley (jbradley@iridiamedical.com), Fire Services Program Lead, to get you started.

 

 

Do You Know Your Heart Disease Risk?

heart disease risk

What is Heart Disease?

Heart disease is a term used to describe a range of diseases that affect your heart. Diseases that fall under the definition of heart disease include coronary artery disease; cardiac arrest, heart infections and heart defects you’re born with.

What’s Your Heart Disease Risk?

Unfortunately there’s no definitive measurement to gauge the likelihood of suffering a cardiac emergency – reducing your heart disease risk is your best strategy. Steps to take include regular checkups, screening for heart disease, and living a heart-healthy lifestyle.

It is a little known fact that heart disease accounts for 20 percent of all Canadian deaths and 90 percent of Canadians have at least one of the following risk factors:

  • High blood pressure (hypertension)
  • High blood cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Being overweight
  • Excessive alcohol consumption
  • Physical inactivity
  • Smoking
  • Stress 

For more information on risk factors, we recommend you assess yourself with the H&S Risk Calculator – a personalized tool to help you find out what’s putting you at risk.

 

Heart Disease Outlook

With obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes on the rise, it is expected that the incidence of heart disease and stroke will swell in upcoming generations. Lifestyle changes have led to sedentary work environments, poor diets, high sodium intake and increased stress which all contribute to heart disease.

Heart Disease Facts

  • Every day, heart disease and stroke lead to nearly 1,000 hospital visits
  • Heart disease and stroke rob Canadians of nearly 250,000 potential years of life
  • Heart disease and stroke kills more women than men, a fact that many women may not realize
  • Today, less than 10% of children meet recommended physical activity guidelines and less than half eat the recommended fruit and vegetables for optimum health

The most important line of defense is to adopt a heart-healthy lifestyle that can guard against heart disease before it strikes.

 

 

Driving Innovation With Our Mobile Medical Unit

In early 2013, Iridia accomplished one of its most innovative projects to date – the design, building and deployment of a mobile medical unit (MMU) in a remote oil and gas camp in Northeastern BC. 

The MMU is an industry first in British Columbia and was born out of the need for enhanced on-site medical treatment options for remote oil and gas camps.  During certain times of the year, evacuation of emergency or non-emergent patients can be impossible due to the weather conditions which then require the patient to remain in camp for extended periods of time.  With the deployment of the MMU, ill and injured workers can, in many cases, receive definitive care which enables them to stay in camp and avoid the hazards of transport to another medical facility.  

What exactly is the Mobile Medical Unit?

We like to describe the MMU as an RV on steroids!

It is a 53-foot trailer that expands to become a 1000 square foot workspace. It is fully equipped with equipment that would be found in a small hospital including a mini-lab, pharmacy, x-ray machine, and some of the latest diagnostic equipment, as well as with simple over-the-counter medications, antibiotics and narcotics for pain management. It is designed to house multiple patients for an extended period of time and is staffed 24/7 by an emergency trained physician. 

MMU Mobile Medical Unit MMU Mobile Medical Unit

By providing this facility in a remote camp, not only will it provide enhanced care for our patients, but it will also serve as an opportunity to study how this care model can impact the health and wellness of a camp population.

The Iridia MMU is one of only two mobile hospitals in British Columbia, with the other having been funded by the BC Government to support the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics.  It is one of our greatest accomplishments as a company and speaks to our values of innovation, teamwork and quality. 

 

Heart Month 2014, Help Spread the Word

Heart Month 2014It is a little known fact that heart disease and stroke take one life every 7 minutes and, astonishingly, 90 percent of Canadians have at least one risk factor.

With obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes on the rise, it is expected that the incidence of heart disease and stroke will swell in upcoming generations. Lifestyle changes have led to sedentary work environments, poor diets, high sodium intake and increased stress which all contribute to heart disease. We are facing what the Heart and Stroke Foundation calls the “perfect storm.”

Heart Disease Facts

  • Everyday, heart disease and stroke lead to nearly 1,000 hospital visits.
  • Heart disease and stroke rob Canadians of nearly 250,000 potential years of life
  • Heart disease and stroke kills more women than men, a fact that many women may not realize.
  • Today, less than 10% of children meet recommended physical activity guidelines and less than half eat the recommended fruit and vegetables for optimum health.

Heart Month 2014

Today, you can make a difference by celebrating Heart Month 2014 and eliminate preventable heart disease. For over 60 years, the Heart and Stroke Foundation has organized Heart Month, one of the largest fundraising campaigns in Canada in the battle against these two killers.

Heart Month brings together tens of thousands of Canadians who volunteer and donate to raise funds for this worthy cause – funds which will help support life-saving research and the raising of awareness of heart disease and stroke within the community. Learn how you can participate and join the Heart Month Community.

As heart disease is an issue that is very personal to us, Iridia will donate a portion of the proceeds from your purchase of AED’s, AED accessories or workshops to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. We value and appreciate the hard work the Heart and Stroke Foundation is doing and we are thankful to have them as a partner against heart disease.

In recognition of Heart Month, Iridia is offering 10% off all AEDs purchased in the month of February and 1 year of free medical direction for first time purchasers. For more information, please contact AED Sales at 1-888-404-6444.

Heart Month 2014 Banner

It is an uphill battle against heart disease and stroke, but it’s a battle we can win – help us and spread the word!

 

The Case for Public Access to AEDs

Automated External Defibrillator Banner

For one man, a trip to a local mall turned into a cardiac emergency. Without warning, he was struck by sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) – a life-threatening condition that affects up to 40,000 Canadians each year. Without rapid treatment, particularly a shock delivered by an automated external defibrillator (AED), most cardiac arrests result in death.

This man was fortunate to have had his SCA event in the right place and at the right time. Mall security immediately started CPR and knew that using an AED was the critical next step. Fortunately, a London Drugs store was nearby. They had an easily accessible AED located in their pharmacy and, most importantly, staff trained to use it. Thanks to the actions of mall security and London Drugs staff, this man beat the odds and survived his cardiac arrest.

London Drugs AED

Having ready access to an AED is key, as every 1 minute delay in defibrillation will reduce survival rates by 7% to 10%. The fact that London Drugs had an AED immediately available significantly contributed to this man’s survival – London Drugs clearly demonstrates the importance of public access defibrillation (PAD) programs.

London Drugs is a pioneer in Canada when it comes to implementing a workplace AED program. London Drugs was the first major retailer in Canada to put AEDs into all of their stores and they have trained over 1,000 employees in CPR and the use of an AED. The program was developed in partnership with Iridia Medical who is an industry leader in PAD program development and implementation. Each London Drugs store has an AED located in the pharmacy and the front door of every store has a window sticker indicating that the location is equipped with an AED.

London Drugs AED

London Drugs’ AED program actively promotes their “good neighbour” policy in recognition that none of the surrounding retail outlets has an AED present. If an AED is needed, London Drugs and their staff are there to help. To date, the AEDs have been used 7 times since the program launched in 2009. In 4 cases, the incidents occurred at surrounding businesses that did not have an AED and London Drug staff responded with their AED. These businesses now further appreciate the importance of quickly using an AED during an SCA to raise survival rates.

Canada is making strides when it comes to widespread public access to AEDs. In 2013, the Heart and Stroke Foundation launched a formal PAD Program in British Columbia. This important initiative will see about 650 AEDs placed in public locations over three years. Additionally, in 2014, the government of Canada in partnership with the Heart and Stroke Foundation launched a national campaign. This ground-breaking program will see over 2,000 AEDs installed in arenas and recreational facilities across Canada.

London Drugs’ AED partner, Iridia Medical, is involved in both of the provincial and federal programs which will help raise the awareness of AEDs and hopefully raise out-of-hospital survival rates.

London Drugs is a glowing example of a workplace AED Program as well as a public access AED program for the community. In our next blog, we will take a look at what the future holds for public access to AEDs. In the meantime, please help us by spreading the word about the importance of AEDs - learn more.

 

 

Iridia Helps Deliver Innovative Pediatric Simulation

sim baby

If you’ve visited Surrey Memorial Hospital’s new Pediatric Emergency Department, you will be pleased to know that Iridia’s founder Dr. Allan Holmes played a key role in development and delivery of a Pediatric Emergency Medicine Simulation course prior to the department opening.  

Physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists and clinical pharmacists used state of the art SIM-man and SIM-baby simulators to practice their clinical skills, inter-professional communications and teamwork. It provided an ideal way to master managing critical medical situations with no risk to real patients.

A First for Fraser Health

Last September, before the new Emergency opened, Surrey Memorial hosted a Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) Simulation Course in our new Pediatric Emergency Department. This course was the first of its kind in for Fraser Health.

Eighty People, Four Simulations

Over 30 physicians and nearly 50 clinical staff attended. This included nurses, respiratory therapists, and clinical pharmacologists.

Using infant and child manikins, they rotated through four hands-on, interactive simulation scenarios: Pediatric Airway, Breathing, Circulation/Shock, and Disability/Seizure. This included basic life support, respiratory distress and failure, cardiac arrest algorithms, vascular access, recognition and management of shock, CNS emergencies, status epilepticus, and trauma.

It was also an excellent opportunity for participants to further orient themselves in the new Emergency Department and with new resuscitation equipment before it opened to patients in October.

A Collaboration

BC Children’s Hospital (BCCH) and SMH co-designed and ran the course. Key players were Drs. Navid Dehghani and Garth Meckler of BCCH, and Drs. Wade Sabados of SMH, Edward Mak of OHM Medical Training Services and Dr. Allan Holmes and Diana Paraan of Iridia Medical.   

PEM is a great example of how Fraser Health and Child Health BC collaborate to support professional development within the Surrey Memorial Hospital Pediatric Emergency Department.

pediatric simulation

Custom Designed Course

The course was custom-designed for the SMH setting to ensure it was practical and relevant for participants. To maximize learning, PEM was led by highly experienced physicians and nurse instructors plus the student-to-instructor ratio was kept low. Laerdal provided 3 manikins and their senior product manager also attended.

‘Great Instructors’ and ‘Great Experience’

The Pediatric Emergency Medicine Course was a resounding success. Participants especially liked the hands-on realistic scenarios, and the multi-disciplinary approach to learning. Many even said they’d like to attend PEM again and would recommend the course to colleagues!

PEM definitely met the goal of increasing the confidence of participants in dealing with pediatric emergencies. 

 

The Chilling Effects of Frostbite

Frostbite

At Iridia, many of our paramedics work in remote oil and gas camps in northern British Columbia. We encourage them to be prepared for whatever they may come across in these regions. Lately, frostbite has been a key concern.

In recent days much of Canada has been dowsed in northern-like temperatures. With temperatures reaching -30°C in some areas, it’s important for everyone to understand symptoms and causes of frostbite.

Frostbite occurs when the skin and body tissue just underneath it freezes. Your skin becomes very cold, then numb, hard and pale. Frostbite typically affects smaller, more exposed areas of your body, such as your fingers and ears.

What are the stages of frostbite?

The first stage of frostbite is frostnip — a mild form of frostbite in which your skin turns red and feels very cold. Frostnip doesn’t do permanent damage.

The second stage of frostbite appears as reddened skin that turns white or very pale. The skin may remain soft, but some ice crystals may form in the tissue. Skin may begin to feel deceptively warm — a sign of serious skin involvement.

As frostbite progresses, it affects all layers of the skin, including the tissues that lie below. Deceptive numbness may occur in which all sensation of cold, pain or discomfort is lost. Joints or muscles may no longer work. Afterward, the area turns black and hard as the tissue dies.

What are the symptoms of frostbite?

  • A slightly painful, prickly or itching sensation
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Hard or waxy-looking skin
  • A cold or burning feeling
  • Numbness
  • Clumsiness due to joint stiffness
  • Blistering, in severe cases

frostbite treatment

What are the causes of frostbite?

Frostbite occurs in two ways:

Frostbite can occur in conjunction with hypothermia — a condition in which your body loses heat faster than it produces heat, causing dangerously low body temperature. When core body temperature lowers, it decreases circulation and threatens vital organs. This triggers a “life over limb” response, meaning your body protects vital organs, sometimes at the expense of extremities. With decreased circulation, your body temperature lowers and the tissue freezes at -2C.

Frostbite can also occur with direct contact. If you’re in direct contact with something very cold, such as ice or metal, heat is conducted away from your body. Such exposure lowers the temperature of the skin and freezes the tissue.

As always, stay safe. If you experience any of the symptoms above, seek medical attention. For more information, head over to CBC to learn more about frostbite and how it affects you at different wind-chill levels. 

 

Moving Toward an AED Utopia

Automated External DefibrillatorsEarlier this week, we posted the first blog in a 2-part series as a follow up to the recent episode on CBC Marketplace in which the question was posed as to whether publicly accessible defibrillators are really that accessible.

In our first blog, we looked at the challenges associated with publicly accessible defibrillators.  In this blog, we will consider some of the solutions which are available to overcome the challenges profiled in our first story and how you can help.

AED Density

As mentioned in our earlier blog, AED density is our first challenge. Ideally, we would like to see a 75 percent survival rate for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. To achieve this, the first person/s on the scene would have to travel no more than 450 feet to reach an AED (about 90 seconds each way using a brisk walking pace of 300 feet per minute). This is an ambitious goal with a very simple solution – AEDs need to be everywhere; in our restaurants, cars, places of work and any other highly trafficked public location.

Fortunately, a couple of initiatives are underway to place AEDs into these high traffic locations:

  • In British Columbia, the Public Access to Defibrillation (PAD) Program, funded by the Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC & Yukon and the Ministry of Health, will see 650 AEDs and associated training delivered to communities throughout BC. The expected impact, as articulated by Health Minister Margaret MacDiarmid, will be to “save hundreds of lives”. Learn more about the BC PAD Program.
  • The Government of Canada recently announced the National AED Program – Federal AED Placement Initiative, which will see a targeted 3,000 AEDs distributed to recreational facilities, mostly arenas, across the country. The Initiative will also see 30,000 people trained in the use of AEDs. Learn more about the National PAD Program.

AED Accessibility

The second challenge we mentioned in our earlier blog is accessibility. AEDs are often placed with little regard to the possibility of their eventual use. The solution for companies and for establishments such as hotels, restaurants, recreational facilities and the like is to implement an AED program, with oversight provided by a medical director, before an AED is installed.

Searching for Defibrillator

In addition to determining, as part of the program, where an AED should be placed and what signage should appear, an AED program will also help with:

  • choosing an appropriate AED and accessories
  • setting up a servicing schedule for the AED
  • planning initial and ongoing training in the use of the AED
  • integrating the AED into your medical emergency response plan
  • liaising with local EMS providers

AED programs are designed to maximize the value of your AED and meet all the recommendations from the Heart and Stroke Foundation, WorkSafeBC, and Health Canada.

AED Awareness

Of all the components that lead to a successful AED program deployment, and hopefully, to lives being saved when the need arises, awareness is the critical issue. By talking about sudden cardiac arrest and how it can be treated with the use of an AED, we are all doing our part with raising awareness of this critical issue in the community.

In contrast to the tragic SCA incident we mentioned in our first blog, take a look at the following video profiling an NHL player who suffered SCA on the ice, and who was saved thanks to an easily accessible AED and the fast actions of his teammates and an onlooker:

As you can see, SCA can happen to anyone, anywhere, at any time. You never know when your CPR skills and an AED will be needed.  Take a look around at the public places you often visit and see whether you can spot the AEDs.  You might need to know one day exactly where they’re located.

Iridia is working to raise awareness of locations of AEDs through its AEDs Everywhere campaign – a crowdsourcing campaign to map the location of AEDs all around the world. The AEDs Everywhere map allows anyone to upload the location of an AED.

Learn more about the program and how to participate.

Since 1998, Iridia has overseen the training and certification of over 30,000 individuals in the use of AEDs. We currently provide AED medical direction to over 300 clients including 140+ fire rescue services.