November Innovation – The Heart Hero App

At the heart of Iridia, lay one of our eight core values, innovation. As CPR month comes to a close we wanted to highlight one of the most innovative CPR tools out there. It’s called Heart Hero (get it here from the Apple App Store), an interactive mobile app that lets you practice CPR to the catchy beat of the Bee Gees’ hit, Stayin’ Alive.

Heart Hero was created by Genius Factor Games who donated their time and experience to develop this app specifically for the Heart and Stroke Foundation. The goal of this partnership was to create a fun, easy and free tool to learn CPR on the go. Why did they choose Stayin’ Alive? You may have heard that the song’s rhythm provides the perfect pace for performing CPR, and it’s true, the beat hits the nail on the head and is easy to remember in a pinch.

Who should download this app? Heart Hero is for anyone who would like to establish a basic foundation of CPR knowledge. For those who aren’t comfortable with the CPR process, but would like to take a first critical stride, this app is a great start. Heart Hero will walk you through the appropriate steps and give you the tools you need if you find yourself in a situation where you need to perform CPR.

Some of the features include:

  • Video tutorial on the 2011 definition of CPR and using en AED (automatic external defibrillator).
  • Heart & Stroke Foundation office finder (Canada-wide).
  • Important facts about CPR and the Heart & Stroke Foundation.
  • Seven challenging Heart Hero mini-games to test your skills in saving a patient with the basic CPR techniques.
Heart Hero

Heart Hero Screenshot

“It’s clear that cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves the odds of surviving cardiac arrest, but just as importantly, the app provides CPR practitioners with the practice and confidence needed to employ those skills in an emergency situation,” said Lisa Hutcheon, Manager of Patient Programs at the Heart and Stroke Foundation, BC & Yukon.

Unfortunately many individuals hold back from performing CPR because they are afraid they will do it wrong. The truth is, is that not doing anything at all will be the worst case scenario. “The technique is actually less important than doing chest compressions quickly and firmly,” says Hutcheon.

We urge all Canadians to learn CPR, by learning a little bit now you can potentially save a life later. On the quest to bring CPR knowledge to all Canadians, this is a great leap forward. It is innovations such as this that Iridia can stand behind.

*It is important to note, while the app is a valuable tool to practice CPR, it does not replace CPR certification.
*The Heart and Stroke Foundation recommends that all Canadians learn the life-saving skills of CPR and review this knowledge often.

Understanding the Risks of Heart Disease and Stroke

If you would like to understand your risk of heart disease and stroke, then try this quiz out. It only takes a few minutes and gives a lot of great feedback w/ personalized summary.

Risks of Heart Disease and Stroke

The quiz is part of the Heart and Stroke Foundations new campaign to “make death wait.”

Their goals are to reduce deaths due to heart disease and stroke by 25% by 2020. That’s 25,000 lives – the size of a typical town – that could be saved every year.

Follow this link to try out the quiz:
http://ww1.heartandstroke.ca/hs_Risk.asp?media=risk_MDW_Twitter

As a health care consulting and cardiac care training firm, one of Global Medical Services’ goals is to bring exceptional health care and training to everyone. Part of the way we do this is by generating awareness for terrible health conditions such as heart disease and stroke. If you would like to donate, volunteer, or find out more information about the “Make Death Wait” campaign, please follow this link:
http://mdw.heartandstroke.ca/actions

You Don’t Need to be a Doctor… AED Facts

These days anyone can save a life. Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) make it possible for bystanders to perform life saving actions with little or no training. Voice prompts and simple instructions make AEDs incredibly easy to operate, giving any rescuer the chance to act.

For those of you who don’t know, an AED is a small machine that can analyze a heart rhythm. It can determine whether or not the heart rhythm is beating effectively, if not, the AED can deliver a shock that will likely restart the heart.  An AED will only advise the individual using the device to deliver a shock if the heart is in a rhythm which can be corrected by defibrillation.

AED Facts

Signs of cardiac arrest include: no breathing, no movement or response to initial rescue breaths, and no pulse. Often the only “cure” of sudden cardiac arrest is rapid defibrillation with an AED. 

AED Facts
http://www.heartandstroke.com

• In Canada, 35,000 to 45,000 people die of sudden cardiac arrest each year

• AEDs are safe, easy to use, and can be used effectively by trained medical and nonmedical individuals. Trained responders have effectively used AEDs in many public settings, including casinos, airport terminals, and airplanes. Trained laypersons can use AEDs safely and effectively.

• An AED is an efficient and effective means of achieving rapid defibrillation in both the out-of-hospital and in-hospital setting.

• Sudden cardiac arrest occurs with a frequency of roughly 1 per 1000 people 35 years of age or older per year.

• Any location that has 1000 adults over the age of 35 present per day during normal business hours (7.5 hours/day, 5 days per week, 250 days per year) can expect 1 incident of sudden cardiac arrest every 5 years.

• For every one minute delay in defibrillation, the survival rate of a cardiac arrest victim decreases by 7 to 10%. After more than 12 minutes of ventricular fibrillation, the survival rate of adults is less than 5%.

• Currently there is evidence to support a recommendation to use AEDs for children over the age of 1, but not for children under the age of 1.

• Across Canada, some provinces regulate the use of AEDs, while other provinces do not. Information about individual provincial regulations can be obtained from the provincial Heart and Stroke Foundation offices.
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With time being a major critical factor for surviving cardiac arrest, it is imperative that the public have widespread access and training to AED devices. Public Access Defibrillation (PAD) trials have demonstrated a doubling of survival rates (from 15% to 30%) in facilities with high likelihood and with trained staff always available.

Spread the word, AEDs = Lives Saved

 

 

Our AEDs delivered a shock to the BC Hospitality Expo

BC Hospitality Expo

The results are in; the 2011 BC Hospitality Expo was a great success! Tom and Julie had a blast as they met people from all over the hospitality industry. Fascinated faces looked on as they gave Automated External Defibrillator (AED) demos and enlightened people on sudden cardiac arrest… Apparently our branded pens were a huge hit as well; with some taking a many as they could get their hands on.

Global Medical Services definitely had some “wow!” aimed our way. “People were amazed at how small and portable AEDs are,” said Julie. And it’s true, if you have never seen an AED in action before it will really surprise you on how simple and easy it is to use. Our display was a real eye opener for quite a few individuals. It was not just the ease of use that turned heads, but also the maintenance of the AEDs as well. With 8 year warranties and batteries that last up to five years, we offer the full package.

During the two day event, Tom and Julie were asked numerous questions about AEDs but a few came up quite a bit:

Q – “Why do I need this device when I can just call 911?”
A – The answer is simple, on average it takes up to 9 minutes for EMS to arrive at the scene. By that time, survival rates can drop to nearly 10%. With an AED on hand a person experiencing sudden cardiac arrest can be defibrillated almost immediately, which will give them a much higher chance of survival.

Q – “What kind of training do I need to use an AED?”
A – You don’t need any training whatsoever to operate an AED. The voice prompts will guide you and tell you all you need to know.

Q – “What about lawsuits, can I get sued for using this AED?”
A – Our Good Samaritan law protects bystanders who serve and tend injured persons from being prosecuted for wrongful death, unless they are found grossly negligent in their care.

AED education still has a ways to go. But hopefully we opened a lot of minds during those two days. Global Medical Services is dedicated to the promotion and expansion of AED programs. They are a very simple way to save lives, that’s the bottom line. Keep your eyes peeled for this sign: