An Important Note Regarding Third Party AED Accessories

Cardiac Science PowerHeart AED G3 Battery

A critical part of AED ownership is ensuring the battery and electrodes are current and up-to-date.  Manufacturers of AEDs also manufacturer their own battery and pads that are approved for use with their devices.  When purchasing your replacement battery and electrodes, it is always important to know who you are purchasing these items from and if they are approved for use with your AED.  

An Important Message from Cardiac Science:

The Food and Drug Administration (Equivalent of Health Canada) extended market clearance for AED electrodes and batteries to third parties. Cardiac Science does not approve or endorse use of these third-party AED products/accessories–batteries, pads, cables, or optional equipment–with any Cardiac Sciences Powerheart® device. These third-party AED products/accessories are not Cardiac Science products or accessories.

Both the Cardiac Science AED warranty and indemnification are void when a Cardiac Science product is installed and deployed with these third-party AED accessories since the use of these third-party AED products/accessories may cause the AED to function improperly during a rescue.

Although these third-party manufacturers may claim that these products may be used in conjunction with a Cardiac Science AED, please be advised that:

  • Market clearance for these third-party AED products/accessories was secured without Cardiac Science council or approval.
  • Cardiac Science has not authorized any third party to manufacture and market its AED products/accessories.
  • Third-party AED products/accessories may not be compatible with Cardiac Science Powerheart® AED models or Rescue Ready® technology. We cannot guarantee that these third-party products have received the same rigorous testing as Cardiac Science branded products.
  • Cardiac Science does not guarantee the performance of any third-party products/accessories, or any AED utilizing them.

In order to ensure that supplies are authentic Cardiac Science products, please look for the Cardiac Science logo and their manufacturing location in Waukesha, WI, on packaging of their electrodes or batteries.

Certified accessories ensures reliability and that the device will be ready to use in a cardiac emergency. Iridia strongly recommends all AED accessories are approved by the manufacturer of your AED.  

 

Become an AED Spotting Superstar!

AEDs Everywhere - AED Spotting

When and where was the last time you saw an Automated External Defibrillator? Do you even remember? Well not to worry, it’s easy to miss something you’re not looking for. Iridia wants to change this. 

AED Spotting: AEDs Everywhere

As a company that implements public AED programs, finding AEDs is kind of exciting for us. After a trip to Japan taken by one of our employees, she found that AEDs are everywhere – train stations, shopping centres, tourist attractions, anywhere where there was a high risk of an SCA. Photos were snapped & shared and other staff began taking photos of AEDs they had spotted on their travels. Now we have over 500 AEDs spotted from around the world!

This is where AEDs Everywhere comes in – a crowdsourcing campaign to map the location of AEDs all around the world. Now it’s your turn to search for AEDs with us. When you do find one, upload your photo and location to our map and you’ll be entered to win a prize!

Click here for rankings and more:
AEDs Everywhere - AED Spotting

How to Participate

  1. Find an AED and snap a photo – You can be in it to. Don’t be afraid to use your imagination (wacky poses are welcome!)
  2. Upload the photo directly to our AEDs Everywhere map by clicking on the Add button on the top right-hand corner
  3. Win a prize, with each submission, you are entered into our two draws and we will donate $1 to the Heart and Stroke Foundation
  4. Pat yourself on the back for raising awareness of AED’s everywhere!​

Why Participate?

  • Each submission enters you into a draw!
  • For every AED Photo you submit, you have a chance to win either a $50 gift card* or an Iridia Gift Bag**
  • With every AED photo submitted, Iridia will donate $1 to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.***
  • Every photo you take will help increase AED awareness, so tell your friends and family to snap AED photos when they spot one!
*The individual who submits the most AEDs from June 1 to July 31 will win the $50 gift card  **Every submitter will be entered to win an Iridia gift bag with: 4gb USB, water bottle, pen, umbrella and notebook  ***Up to a maximum of $200.00

AEDs Everywhere Map – View Fullscreen

Good luck on way your to becoming an AED spotting superstar!

 

 

Tour D’Iridia: Day 1!

Logo 2As announced last week, today is the official start of Michael Galasso’s Tour D’Iridia! We’re excited to see finally have this project move forward after many months of careful preparation.

To begin, we want to share Michael’s tour schedule with you. If you live near an area he will be stopping at, we hope you can stop by and encourage him along the way.

 

Day 1 – September 29th

Day 2 – September 30th

Day 3 – October 1st

Day 4 – October 2nd

Day 5 – October 3rd

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

As you can see, Michael has a very packed schedule for 5 days straight. At each stop he will be meeting with people who are responsible for the AED, and ensuring they’re comfortable using the device if they ever need to. During his trip, he will be documenting all of his visits and we’ll be posting these shots on our social media pages.

During our event, we’ll be posting information about Michaels whereabouts, infographics, real time updates and more. Keep your eyes out as we’ll also be hosting a social media quiz. The person who answers the most questions correctly will win a $25 donation to the Heart and Stroke Foundation in their name!

 

If you’d like to stay up to date, make sure to join us on our Facebook page where all the action will be happening!

AEDs in Canada, Brought to You by Team Iridia!

AEDs in Canada

It’s already been an active year for Iridia Medical’s AED department. Late in 2013 Automatic External Defibrillators (AEDs) were making headlines in the media with the CBC Marketplace feature “Shock to the System.” This publicity has kept us busy working to further raise awareness of AEDs in Canada.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) can happen to anyone, anywhere, at any time. You never know when your CPR skills and an AED will be needed, and you might need to know one day exactly where they’re located. That’s why we’re tracking AEDs through our AEDs Everywhere campaign – a crowdsourcing campaign to map the location of AEDs all around the world.

Check out Iridia’s AED scavenger hunt in action:

Heart and Stroke Foundation

Last November we saw the launch of the Heart and Stroke Foundation’s Federal AED Program. Iridia is a preferred distributer for the 3-year program and we have already placed AEDs and provided training across BC, Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and the Yukon.

We are continuing to work with the Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC on their Public Access to Defibrillation Program (PAD). To date the BC PAD program has placed 178 AEDs into Communities across the province. We have already seen a life saved, and we know that many more will be saved over the course of the program! 

Richmond Save Visit

Minoru Aquatic Centre - AEDs in Canada

Earlier this year, Iridia’s AED team was lucky enough to meet a group of local heroes. We met with the Lifeguard staff at Minoru Aquatic Centre in Richmond responsible for saving an individual’s life with CPR and an AED. We were proud to present them with a Save Certificate honouring their impressive lifesaving actions!

Buildex

In February, we attended Buildex 2014 at the Vancouver Convention Centre. We spoke to many contractors, construction companies and property management firms about starting AED programs at their work sites. We would love to see AEDs required as part of BC’s building code. This type of legislation would be a great leap forward in creating wider public access to defibrillators.

Pacific Dental

AEDs in Canada

The College of Dental Surgeons of BC are in the process of adjusting their Dental Sedation Guidelines. Some of the proposed changes include the recommendation of an AED at all dental offices offering sedation and requiring dentists to be Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) certified. At the Pacific Dental Conference, we answered questions and provided information about the proposed guideline changes and Iridia’s dental solutions. Iridia’s AED and education teams are prepared to help all BC dentists create programs to meet the new sedation guidelines.

Lunch and Learn @ YVR

The Iridia AED team has been taking our show on the road lately! In January, we packed up the Ambu-Smartman and delivered a Lunch and Learn at Vancouver International Airport (YVR). The talk covered SCA and the benefits of using an AED, while our Ambu-Smartman competition saw some of the highest scores we have ever seen from one group!

American Heart Association’s CPR Kiosk

Airports have been at the forefront of CPR and AED programs for many years now, and many are actively promoting CPR and AED training. Last year we saw the Dallas-Fortworth Airport unveil the American Heart Association’s CPR Kiosk, which allowed people to practice their CPR skills while they waited for flights.

Iridia’s AED Department is always available to answer questions and provide information about starting an AED program in your community or workplace. For more information, please don’t hesitate to contact us – we’re here to help.

 

 

Moving Toward an AED Utopia

Automated External Defibrillator Banner

Part II in a series. View part I

Earlier this week, we posted the first blog in a 2-part series as a follow up to the recent episode on CBC Marketplace in which the question was posed as to whether publicly accessible defibrillators are really that accessible.

In our first blog, we looked at the challenges associated with publicly accessible defibrillators.  In this blog, we will consider some of the solutions which are available to overcome the challenges profiled in our first story and how you can help.

AED Density

As mentioned in our earlier blog, AED density is our first challenge. Ideally, we would like to see a 75 percent survival rate for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. To achieve this, the first person/s on the scene would have to travel no more than 450 feet to reach an AED (about 90 seconds each way using a brisk walking pace of 300 feet per minute). This is an ambitious goal with a very simple solution – AEDs need to be everywhere; in our restaurants, cars, places of work and any other highly trafficked public location.

Fortunately, a couple of initiatives are underway to place AEDs into these high traffic locations:

  • In British Columbia, the Public Access to Defibrillation (PAD) Program, funded by the Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC & Yukon and the Ministry of Health, will see 650 AEDs and associated training delivered to communities throughout BC. The expected impact, as articulated by Health Minister Margaret MacDiarmid, will be to “save hundreds of lives”. Learn more about the BC PAD Program.
  • The Government of Canada recently announced the National AED Program – Federal AED Placement Initiative, which will see a targeted 3,000 AEDs distributed to recreational facilities, mostly arenas, across the country. The Initiative will also see 30,000 people trained in the use of AEDs. Learn more about the National PAD Program.

AED Accessibility

The second challenge we mentioned in our earlier blog is accessibility. AEDs are often placed with little regard to the possibility of their eventual use. The solution for companies and for establishments such as hotels, restaurants, recreational facilities and the like is to implement an AED program, with oversight provided by a medical director, before an AED is installed.

looking for an AED

In addition to determining, as part of the program, where an AED should be placed and what signage should appear, an AED program will also help with:

  • choosing an appropriate AED and accessories
  • setting up a servicing schedule for the AED
  • planning initial and ongoing training in the use of the AED
  • integrating the AED into your medical emergency response plan
  • liaising with local EMS providers

AED programs are designed to maximize the value of your AED and meet all the recommendations from the Heart and Stroke Foundation, WorkSafeBC, and Health Canada.

AED Awareness

Of all the components that lead to a successful AED program deployment, and hopefully, to lives being saved when the need arises, awareness is the critical issue. By talking about sudden cardiac arrest and how it can be treated with the use of an AED, we are all doing our part with raising awareness of this critical issue in the community.

In contrast to the tragic SCA incident we mentioned in our first blog, take a look at the following video profiling an NHL player who suffered SCA on the ice, and who was saved thanks to an easily accessible AED and the fast actions of his teammates and an onlooker:

As you can see, SCA can happen to anyone, anywhere, at any time. You never know when your CPR skills and an AED will be needed.  Take a look around at the public places you often visit and see whether you can spot the AEDs.  You might need to know one day exactly where they’re located.

Iridia is working to raise awareness of locations of AEDs through its AEDs Everywhere campaign – a crowdsourcing campaign to map the location of AEDs all around the world. The AEDs Everywhere map allows anyone to upload the location of an AED.

Learn more about the program and how to participate.

Since 1998, Iridia has overseen the training and certification of over 30,000 individuals in the use of AEDs. We currently provide AED medical direction to over 300 clients including 140+ fire rescue services.

Part II in a series. View part I

The Shocking Truth About AED Use


Part I in a series. View part II

CBC Marketplace recently aired an episode on automated external defibrillators (AEDs) – combining facts regarding their potential life-saving benefits with some disturbing findings regarding their accessibility to the public. As Iridia’s business was built on the need which our Founder, Dr. Allan Holmes, had identified to make AEDs more widely accessible, this issue is near to our hearts.  However, to fully understand the reasons why having AEDs readily available is so important, it is necessary to understand some of the facts regarding sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).

SCA Facts

Up to 40,000 cardiac arrests occur each year in Canada alone. Without rapid treatment, particularly a shock delivered by an AED, most of these cardiac arrests will result in death. On average, every 1 minute delay in defibrillation will reduce survival rates by 7% to 10%.  Simple math suggests that after a 10 minute delay in defibrillation, the likelihood of survival is slim to none.  Further, if you are revived in the 7-10 minute range, the likelihood of notable brain damage and significant lifelong health ramifications thereafter is very high. 

20150401 Iridia Icon Final2474

For this, and other reasons, the Heart and Stroke Foundation recommends an AED response time of three minutes or less. Fortunately, the work being done by the Heart and Stroke Foundation, both at a provincial and a national level, as well as by other organisations, is raising awareness of sudden cardiac arrest and the importance of defibrillation, with the result being that we are seeing a significant increase in the number of AEDs which are being placed in the community.  However, a number of challenges still exist.

Too Few AEDs

Applying an AED to someone in sudden cardiac arrest within the three minute response time guideline recommended by the Heart and Stroke Foundation would require that it takes no longer than 90 seconds to get to an AED, and 90 seconds to return to the SCA victim. Assuming a brisk walking pace of 300 feet per minute (not everyone responding may be able to run), means the responder would ideally have to travel no more than 450 feet to reach an AED. Current deployment for these life-saving devices is nowhere near this level of saturation. Locating an AED can often be compared to searching for a needle in a haystack.

Too Inaccessible

Beyond having an appropriate number of AEDs, there is the issue of where they should be placed.  Best practice recommends having AEDs highly visible and publically accessible; that means they can be easily reachable and the cabinets in which they are stored are unlocked.  Many AEDs installed in public locations are either hidden away and/or are under lock and key, accessible only to a limited few who may not be present during a cardiac emergency.

Too Little AED Awareness

Despite, in some instances, the above two issues having been addressed, a successful outcome after an SCA event is not guaranteed. Many individuals are still unaware of AEDs and their lifesaving benefits and would not know or think to use one in an emergency. Sadly, there was a tragic case in Calgary where a young athlete collapsed from SCA, the AED was retrieved, but nobody used it on the victim and he died. As can be seen, there are a number of issues which still need to be addressed in the quest for making AEDs more publicly accessible and raising awareness of their lifesaving benefits. 

Later this week, we will consider some of the solutions which are available to overcome the challenges associated with this.  Check in with us again to learn of these and, as always, we welcome your comments and contributions about this important issue.

 Part I in a series. View part II

AEDs are Everywhere, Help us Find Them!

AEDs are Everywhere

For the past few months, we’ve found a new hobby at Iridia and we’d like to invite you to participate!

Before we get into the prizes and incentives, we ask that you take a minute to watch the following PSA created by Transport for London:

 

Now think about this: when and where was the last time you saw an Automated External Defibrillator (AED)?  As you’ve just learned, it’s easy to miss something you’re not looking for.

We want to change this.

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) can happen to anyone, at any time, and anywhere. You never know when your CPR skills and an AED will be needed and only when you start looking do you become aware of AEDs.

As a company that implements public AED programs, among other services, finding AEDs is kind of exciting. After a trip to Japan taken by one of our employees, she found that AEDs are everywhere – train stations, shopping centres, tourist attractions, anywhere where there was a high risk of an SCA. Photos were snapped & shared and other staff began taking photos of AEDs they had spotted on their travels. So far we have 88 photos from across North America, Asia, and Europe!

We decided to create an interactive map to show that AEDs really are everywhere. We now want this map to grow, which is why we’re inviting you to do some AED spotting as part of our first AED spotting competition to be held until December 31st, 2013.

 

AEDs Everywhere Map – View Fullscreen

Why should you participate?

  1. You can’t recall the last time you saw an AED.
  2. You want to win a $30 gift card to Chapters – our favourite store to promote lifelong learning.
  3. More importantly, for every unique photo of an AED, Iridia Medical will donate $1 to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC & Yukon, up to a maximum of $500.

How can you participate?

  1. Find an AED.
  2. Take a photo of the AED (you can be in it too!).
  3. Email the photo and location to ssaito@iridiamedical.com who will add it to the map. You can also upload the photo directly to our AEDs Everywhere map by clicking on the Add button on the top right-hand corner.
  4. Pat yourself on the back for your $1 donation.
  5. Repeat!

As you’ve learned from the PSA above, it’s easy to miss something you’re not looking for – so let’s start looking for AEDs and do some good at the same time.

 

Contest Details: Contest commences on December 2nd and closes on December 31st, 2013. To be entered in the contest, you must submit a photo and location of an AED to Shannon Saito or directly to the map. Submitting multiple photos will not increase your chances of winning the Chapters gift card. Submitting multiple photos will, however, increase the donation amount to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, up to a total of $500. On January 2nd 2014, we will conduct a random draw and announce the winner via social media. The winner will also be notified via email. By submitting photos to Iridia Medical, we do not own the rights to your photo -- you're simply lending us rights for specific uses (on the AEDs Everywhere map, social media, company newsletter) and submitting your photo does not preclude you from using it in any way you see fit in the future.

AEDs From Coast to Coast

We Love AEDs

As you might already know, we love our Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) at Iridia Medical.

In fact, our company was founded because of this passion for AEDs and their life-saving abilities.  In 1998, publicly-accessible AEDs and workplace AED programs did not exist – only ambulance attendants and fire rescue personnel had access to AEDs. We challenged this practice and pioneered the first public-access AED program in British Columbia. As the foundation of our expanding company, we remain passionate about AEDs and continue to implement and support AED programs across Canada.

Since 1998, we have become a leading distributor of Cardiac Science and Physio-Control AEDs and have placed thousands across the country – 1,998 AEDs in 269 cities/towns/communities to be exact (as of September 19, 2013).

It can be difficult to visualize numbers and for this reason, we created our Iridia AED Placement map. Not only is this information better visualized but it also speaks to the level of importance that has been placed on AEDs and access to them. Even some of the smallest of towns are equipped with an AED in the event of a Sudden Cardiac Arrest.

1,998 AEDs Throughout Canada

View fullscreen

On this map, we’ve also included AEDs placed through the Heart and Stroke Foundation’s BC Public Access to Defibrillation Program. In this Program, initiated in February 2013, 450 AEDs over a period of three years will be donated to communities across the province. As the exclusive distributer for the Program, we are proud to have placed 100 AEDs across the province (as of September 18, 2013).

We will be updating this map with every AED we place and together we can raise Sudden Cardiac Arrest survival rates from coast to coast.

 

What is an Automated External Defibrillator?

Iridia pioneered the first public-access Automated External Defibrillator (AED) program in British Columbia and we have remained passionate about AEDs. Since our start in 1998, we have become a leading distributor of AEDs and have placed AEDs in almost all places imaginable.

What are Automated Defibrillators and why are they so important?

Automated External Defibrillators

An AED is a portable device that delivers an electric shock to the heart. This shock can stop an irregular heart rhythm due to sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and restore a normal rhythm. SCA is a condition in which the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating. If this happens, blood stops flowing to the brain and other vital organs.

Up to 40,000 cardiac arrests occur each year in Canada alone. Without rapid treatment, most of these cardiac arrests will result in death. After more than 12 minutes of an irregular rhythm, the survival rate from cardiac arrest is less than 5%. On average, every 1 minute delay in defibrillation will reduce survival rates by 7% to 10%. However, the combined use of CPR and an AED may increase the rate of survival to 75% or more.

Cardiac Arrest Survival Rates

Thankfully the complicated and cumbersome defibrillators of the past are gone. Today, defibrillators used in public places and in the home are automated, portable and easy to use. They are no longer limited to the emergency room. AED advances have made it possible for more people to respond to a medical emergency where defibrillation is required.

How does an AED work?

A built-in computer analyses the victim’s heart rhythm through two electrode pads. The computer then calculates whether defibrillation is needed. If it is, a recorded voice tells the rescuer to administer a shock. This shock stuns the heart and stops all activity and gives the heart a chance to resume beating effectively. Instructions will guide the user through the process.

Who can use an AED?

AEDs are designed to help people with minimal training use them safely in tense, emergency situations. They have numerous built-in safeguards and are designed to deliver a shock only if necessary.

Where should AEDs be placed?

All first-responders, including paramedics, law enforcement, fire rescue personnel should have access to an AED. 

Defib Place Icons

Additionally, AEDs should be placed in public areas such as sports arenas, golf courses, gated communities, airports, office complexes, doctors’ offices and any other public or private place where large numbers of people gather. Learn more about Why You Need Access to a Defibrillator.

If you need Tools to Save Lives, visit us at www.iridiamedical.com and learn about our:

  • industry-leading AED units
  • AED training for lay rescuers and professionals
  • unique medical direction packages
  • provincial leading AED programs

 

An Automated External Defibrillator (AED) Saves Another Life

With the recent launch of the province-wide Public Access Defibrillation (PAD) Program, news of an AED save in Toronto couldn’t have come at a better time. Since 2006, the public defibrillator program in Ontario, funded by the Heart and Stroke Foundation has saved 48 lives.

Public Access Defibrillation

Now it is our turn here in BC. With the PAD program underway, we can expect the same impact, as articulated by Health Minister Margaret MacDiarmid, we will be to “save hundreds of lives”. Indeed, with increased access to AEDS, each of the 2000 SCA deaths reported annually in BC has the potential to be avoided.

The team here at Iridia Medical is excited to play an ongoing role with the HSFBC and PAD program, we hope to see many lives saved.

Toronto AED Save

TORONTO, Feb. 13, 2013 /CNW/ – Once again, AEDs and CPR have proven their worth as a Toronto man is alive today thanks to the quick actions of bystanders. 

On Sunday, January 13, a 51-year-old Toronto-area resident Paul Poce was playing hockey at the Malvern Recreation Centre when he collapsed to the ice after suffering a cardiac arrest. His son Ben Poce, who also works as a paramedic for Peel Regional Paramedic Services, immediately rushed to his father’s side. Recognizing the signs and symptoms of cardiac arrest, Poce called out to his teammates to dial 9-1-1, instructed his friend Shawn Nichols to start chest compressions, while he retrieved the on-site AED. 

Read the full story

CPRAbout the Heart and Stroke Foundation:

The Heart and Stroke Foundation (heartandstroke.ca), a volunteer-based health charity, leads in eliminating heart disease and stroke, reducing their impact through the advancement of research and its application, the promotion of healthy living and advocacy.