Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Progress Report

ROC logo

It’s been about seven months since we talked about the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC). In case you missed it, the ROC consists of 10 Regional Clinical Centers that provide the necessary infrastructure to conduct collaborative trials that aid in promising scientific advances to improve resuscitation outcomes.

The ROC is of great interest to us at Iridia as our founder and first responder medical director, Dr. Allan Holmes is involved with the ROC in the collaboration with many fire rescue services throughout British Columbia. 

The ROC is the first large-scale effort in the world to conduct clinical trials focusing on the early delivery of interventions by EMS to better optimize patient survival.

Since we last spoke about the ROC, they’ve released a progress report updating us on statistics within British Columbia.

You can view the entire report below, but here are a few key highlights from the report:

  • The ROC is now a major contributor to Emergency Medical Services (EMS) resuscitation research
  • The implementation of ROC’s multi-site EMS resuscitation consortium is the most efficient means of providing out-of-hospital research
  • ROC Impact on Medical Practice:
    • Has influenced the American Heart Association 2010 Guidelines for CPR and Cardiovascular Care
    • Insights from ROC trials contribute to the Military Joint Forces Combat and Casualty Care Summits

The most important highlight however is the emphasis on quality CPR in BC, which has led to an increase in survival to 13.8 percent in 2012; the highest reported in Canada. This is great news for us at Iridia – every little bit helps, and together we are all making a difference.

If you’d like to help further, join us in celebration of CPR Month, we are offering a discount of 10% on Cardiac Arrest Management (CAM) courses booked during the month of November!

For more information and statistics about the ROC collaboration within British Columbia, please see September 2013 BC ROC Report:

Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium

Learn More About the ROC.

 

What is the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium?

The Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) was created in 2005 to conduct clinical research in the areas of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and traumatic injury.

The ROC consists of 10 Regional Clinical Centers (RCCs) and a Data and Coordinating Center that provides the necessary infrastructure to conduct multiple collaborative trials to aid rapid translation of promising scientific and clinical advances to improve resuscitation outcomes.

The ROC is the first large-scale effort in the world to conduct clinical trials focusing on the early delivery of interventions by EMS to better optimize patient survival.

As a first responder medical director, Dr. Allan Holmes (founder of Iridia Medical) is involved with the ROC through the collaboration of many fire rescue services throughout British Columbia. 

Fore more information and statistics about the ROC collaboration within British Columbia, please see April 2013 BC ROC Report:

ROC Report

Click to view the report.

The ROC is Sponsored By:

Learn More About the ROC

Automated External Defibrillators and Children

Automated External Defibrillators

An automatic external defibrillator is used to restart a heart that is pumping with an ineffective rhythm that does not adequately circulate blood. In most cases AEDs come equipped with defibrillator electrode pads made just for children, but not always.

To address a few concerns, the following is a recent statement to our first-responders on the use of Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) for children.

Automated External Defibrillators and Children

Position Statement

Iridia supports the use of Automated External Defibrillators (AED) in the pediatric population.

The following recommendations are provided for First-Responder Services with AED programs and are consistent with the current Heart and Stroke Foundation guidelines:

  • AEDs equipped with pediatric dose attenuator and pads should be used on children (aged 1-8) and infants (less than 1 year) with no signs of life
  • Pads should be placed in the standard anterior-apex position or in the anterior-posterior position
  • Should pediatric dose attenuator and pads not be immediately available, adult pads may be used on both children and infants with no signs of life.

For more information on AEDs  and their use, please visit our website.

Best Regards,
Dr. Allan Holmes
Medical Director, Iridia

Bath Salts – Medical Director Update

Dr. Allan Holmes & Dr. Erik Vu
Clinical Snapshot: Bath Salts
Subject: Synthetic cathinones
Street name: “Bath Salts”, “Plant Food”, “Cloud Nine”, “Rave”.

What are “Bath Salts”?

Psychoactive drugs containing MDPV1 have entered the recreational drug market, with a recent surge in the United States (US) and Canada. These products are often labeled as “bath salts” or “plant food,” and have been used legally for decades in parts of the US and Europe. These products are also available for online purchase and may be sold under such names as “Cloud Nine” or “Rave.”

What do “Bath Salts” look like?

MDPV and other analogues (e.g. Mephedrone) are often supplied as white powders. Users can snort or ingest these white or brown amorphous or crystalline powders, but since they are soluble in water, these substances can also be injected.

Bath Salts

What are the effects of “Bath Salts”?

MDPV has a chemical structure similar to MDMA2 or “Ecstasy”. The intended effects are improved attention, energy, and euphoria. Clinical features include altered mental status, agitation, delusions, hallucinations, psychosis, fast heart rate, high blood pressure, chest pain and elevated core body temperature, amongst others.

Why are “Bath Salts” dangerous?

MDPV is used as substitute for other stimulants such as amphetamines, cocaine or ecstasy because it can produce the same effects on the brain. MDPV toxicity can present as excited or agitated delirium. Mainstream media have reported bizarre suicides and homicides. Drug-induced psychosis and aggression appear to be more severe than with other amphetamine-like stimulants.

How do you manage patients high on “Bath Salts”?

Agitated patients require urgent medical assessment. Caution should be used when restraining these patients due to the potential of cardiac arrest in patients with excited delirium.

Summary of Key Points

  • MDPV (i.e. “Bath Salts”), has strong stimulant effects similar to cocaine and amphetamines. This compound can be considered an emerging designer drug of abuse.
  • The psychoactive profile of these drugs has gained popularity with widespread use of this compound as recreational drug, particularly among young people.
  • The marketing of MDPV as “bath salts” or “plants fertilizer” provided false assurances on the safety of this substance as drug of abuse.
  • Current case reports show the potential for severe cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity.
  • Excited delirium is characterized by delirium with agitation, elevated temperature, elevated heart rate and breathing pattern, and can be followed by a period of “giving up,” or cessation of struggle, followed by cardiac arrest.
  • Use caution when engaging a patient exhibiting these signs or symptoms. Use caution if/when restraining these patients.
  • Considering the limited information about the clinical, pharmacological and toxicological effects of this substance in combination with the potential health risks, the alertness of the medical and law-enforcement community is of great importance in order to mitigate the downstream effects of MDPV use.

Best Regards,

Allan Holmes

Medical Director, Iridia

13,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone, or MDPV
2methylenedioxymethamphetamine, or MDMA