Canadian PAD Programs Offering Free AEDs and Training!

Free AEDs - BC PAD and National PADCommunities and facilities throughout Canada have the opportunity to receive free AEDs and CPR/AED training through the BC and National PAD Programs.  Iridia would like to raise awareness that these AEDs and training are available through a simple application process.  With the public’s help, we can communicate theseopportunities to communities and facilities that meet the criteria – please spread the word. An increase in AED placements will lead to an increase in lives saved across the country.

Please see the BC PAD Program and the National PAD Program summaries, criteria and application process:

Heart and Stroke BC PAD Program

Program Summary

Since 2013, The Heart and Stroke Foundation (HSF) of BC has been placing free AEDs in areas they identified as priority locations for AEDs.  To date, 264 AEDs have been placed and 3 lives have been saved.

  • The HSF has a goal of placing 450 AEDs
  • The HSF has recently opened up the application process to additional sites

Program Criteria

  • Locations must be open to the public where large numbers of people gather and/or where there may be a delay in accessing emergency services
  • Very small communities that have one central meeting area in town
  • Not-for-profits that perform outreach to large groups of people
  • Senior centres
  • Churches that have a community building attached
  • HUB Schools (host after school programs, rent out the location)
  • Recreation centres
  • Swimming pools / aquatic centres
  • Community centres
  • Public libraries
  • Busy playing fields 
  • Parks and beaches

Application process

  • If a facility/community location meets the above criteria, they will need to complete the application and email it to the BC PAD Program Manager for review/approval
  • Each application asks that the facility provide a letter from the community supporting the site to have an AED installed
  • To learn more about the program, please visit the BC PAD Program Website

Heart and Stroke National PAD Program

Program Summary

Since 2013, The Heart and Stroke Foundation (HSF) of Canada has been placing free AEDs in rinks and arenas all across Canada.  The end goal is to have an AED in every rink and arena from coast to coast. To date, the program has placed 1,773 AEDs in rinks and arenas across Canada. The end goals is to place 8,000 AEDs across Canada.

  • The HSF is still accepting applications from rinks and arenas that do not have an AED
  • The HSF has recently opened the application process up to facilities that are not rinks or arenas

Program Criteria (For non-rinks/arenas)

  • Locations must not have an AED to be considered for a free AED and training
  • Facilities that permit public to use their premises, services or equipment for exercise, fitness training, bodybuilding or similar purposes and where at least 20 hours of indoor/outdoor physical activity programs are held in the majority of weeks in a year. This includes:
    • martial arts facilities
    • dance studios
    • wellness centres
    • curling rinks
    • and similar facilities
  • Special consideration will be given to isolated and remote First Nations, Métis and Inuit community locations, which may include community centres, medical transport, fire departments and central meeting locations

Application process

Thank you in advance for sharing these details with your friends, your communities and facilities that meet the criteria laid out by both programs. Together we can help enable peace of mind. If you have any questions, we’d be more than happy to help – simply contact our AED department at:

 

UBC AED Program Launches with 81 Defibrillators

Sudden Cardiac Arrest Survival RatesIn Canada, 35,000 to 45,000 people die of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) each year. Unlike a heart attack, which is caused by a blockage in an artery, SCA results from an electrical malfunction of the heart. The only effective treatment is a shock by an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). Recognizing the link between increased survival rates in SCA victims and the prompt use of a defibrillator, the Heart and Stroke Foundation has recommended that all Canadians:

  • have widespread access to automated external defibrillators
  • be trained and encouraged to apply CPR and AED skills when needed

The UBC AED Program

When applied to the workplace, these recommendations entail implementing a program that makes AEDs readily available and ensuring that staff are well-prepared to use them when necessary. For these reasons, we’re pleased to have partnered with the University of British Columbia (UBC) to implement their campus-wide public access to defibrillation AED program.

Since 2004, Iridia has worked with UBC on a variety of initiatives including AED fulfilment and accessory replacement, ACLS training for the Department of Dentistry and PALS training for the Department of Anesthesiology. Drawing from our experience in having placed over 3,000 AEDs, we’ve helped UBC create an AED program consisting of three indispensable components:

  1. The AED devices, accessories and servicing

A total of 81 LIFEPAK CR PLUS AEDs (with accessories) are being installed for the UBC AED Program and will be placed in cabinets throughout the campus. The LIFEPAK CR PLUS AED was chosen for the program because it’s easy to use and maintain. Benefits of the LIFEPAK CR PLUS include:

  • Ready to use out of the box
  • Ease of use, simply open the lid, place electrodes and the LIFEPAK will do the rest
  • Increased chance of survival by automatically escalating energy as needed
  • Easy transition to EMS teams who also use LIFEPAK AEDs
  • Automated self-tests ensuring the device is ready to use
  1. Initial and ongoing training

Managing a cardiac arrest involves more than merely “pushing the button” on an AED. Respondents must be able to recognize an arrest, perform CPR, use a defibrillator properly and understand each link in the chain of survival. A number of UBC staff/faculty will receive an AED orientation and AED/CPR training over the coming months.

Chain of Survival 2015

  1. Program Management

Iridia’s customized UBC AED Program is designed to maximize the value of the AEDs placed around the UBC campus. Our program consists of the following components:

  • Integrating AEDs into an emergency response plan
  • AEDs registered and databased at Iridia
  • Liaising with local EMS providers
  • AED Troubleshooting and servicing
  • Post-incident support
  • Physician consultation

UBC is a great example of a public access AED program for the campus and local community. “Iridia Medical is thrilled to be partnering with UBC on the delivery of their fully-comprehensive, campus-wide AED Program.  Their industry-leading program will  position them for the best possible outcome should anyone on campus suffer a Sudden Cardiac Arrest,” – Julie Turley, AED Programs Manager, Iridia Medical.

Since 1998, Iridia has overseen the training and certification of over 10,000 lay rescuers in the use of AEDs. We currently provide medical direction to over 300 clients including 125+ fire rescue services.

 

AEDs in Canada, Brought to You by Team Iridia!

AEDs in Canada

It’s already been an active year for Iridia Medical’s AED department. Late in 2013 Automatic External Defibrillators (AEDs) were making headlines in the media with the CBC Marketplace feature “Shock to the System.” This publicity has kept us busy working to further raise awareness of AEDs in Canada.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) can happen to anyone, anywhere, at any time. You never know when your CPR skills and an AED will be needed, and you might need to know one day exactly where they’re located. That’s why we’re tracking AEDs through our AEDs Everywhere campaign – a crowdsourcing campaign to map the location of AEDs all around the world.

Check out Iridia’s AED scavenger hunt in action:

Heart and Stroke Foundation

Last November we saw the launch of the Heart and Stroke Foundation’s Federal AED Program. Iridia is a preferred distributer for the 3-year program and we have already placed AEDs and provided training across BC, Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and the Yukon.

We are continuing to work with the Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC on their Public Access to Defibrillation Program (PAD). To date the BC PAD program has placed 178 AEDs into Communities across the province. We have already seen a life saved, and we know that many more will be saved over the course of the program! 

Richmond Save Visit

Minoru Aquatic Centre - AEDs in Canada

Earlier this year, Iridia’s AED team was lucky enough to meet a group of local heroes. We met with the Lifeguard staff at Minoru Aquatic Centre in Richmond responsible for saving an individual’s life with CPR and an AED. We were proud to present them with a Save Certificate honouring their impressive lifesaving actions!

Buildex

In February, we attended Buildex 2014 at the Vancouver Convention Centre. We spoke to many contractors, construction companies and property management firms about starting AED programs at their work sites. We would love to see AEDs required as part of BC’s building code. This type of legislation would be a great leap forward in creating wider public access to defibrillators.

Pacific Dental

AEDs in Canada

The College of Dental Surgeons of BC are in the process of adjusting their Dental Sedation Guidelines. Some of the proposed changes include the recommendation of an AED at all dental offices offering sedation and requiring dentists to be Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) certified. At the Pacific Dental Conference, we answered questions and provided information about the proposed guideline changes and Iridia’s dental solutions. Iridia’s AED and education teams are prepared to help all BC dentists create programs to meet the new sedation guidelines.

Lunch and Learn @ YVR

The Iridia AED team has been taking our show on the road lately! In January, we packed up the Ambu-Smartman and delivered a Lunch and Learn at Vancouver International Airport (YVR). The talk covered SCA and the benefits of using an AED, while our Ambu-Smartman competition saw some of the highest scores we have ever seen from one group!

American Heart Association’s CPR Kiosk

Airports have been at the forefront of CPR and AED programs for many years now, and many are actively promoting CPR and AED training. Last year we saw the Dallas-Fortworth Airport unveil the American Heart Association’s CPR Kiosk, which allowed people to practice their CPR skills while they waited for flights.

Iridia’s AED Department is always available to answer questions and provide information about starting an AED program in your community or workplace. For more information, please don’t hesitate to contact us – we’re here to help.

 

 

Moving Toward an AED Utopia

Automated External Defibrillator Banner

Part II in a series. View part I

Earlier this week, we posted the first blog in a 2-part series as a follow up to the recent episode on CBC Marketplace in which the question was posed as to whether publicly accessible defibrillators are really that accessible.

In our first blog, we looked at the challenges associated with publicly accessible defibrillators.  In this blog, we will consider some of the solutions which are available to overcome the challenges profiled in our first story and how you can help.

AED Density

As mentioned in our earlier blog, AED density is our first challenge. Ideally, we would like to see a 75 percent survival rate for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. To achieve this, the first person/s on the scene would have to travel no more than 450 feet to reach an AED (about 90 seconds each way using a brisk walking pace of 300 feet per minute). This is an ambitious goal with a very simple solution – AEDs need to be everywhere; in our restaurants, cars, places of work and any other highly trafficked public location.

Fortunately, a couple of initiatives are underway to place AEDs into these high traffic locations:

  • In British Columbia, the Public Access to Defibrillation (PAD) Program, funded by the Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC & Yukon and the Ministry of Health, will see 650 AEDs and associated training delivered to communities throughout BC. The expected impact, as articulated by Health Minister Margaret MacDiarmid, will be to “save hundreds of lives”. Learn more about the BC PAD Program.
  • The Government of Canada recently announced the National AED Program – Federal AED Placement Initiative, which will see a targeted 3,000 AEDs distributed to recreational facilities, mostly arenas, across the country. The Initiative will also see 30,000 people trained in the use of AEDs. Learn more about the National PAD Program.

AED Accessibility

The second challenge we mentioned in our earlier blog is accessibility. AEDs are often placed with little regard to the possibility of their eventual use. The solution for companies and for establishments such as hotels, restaurants, recreational facilities and the like is to implement an AED program, with oversight provided by a medical director, before an AED is installed.

looking for an AED

In addition to determining, as part of the program, where an AED should be placed and what signage should appear, an AED program will also help with:

  • choosing an appropriate AED and accessories
  • setting up a servicing schedule for the AED
  • planning initial and ongoing training in the use of the AED
  • integrating the AED into your medical emergency response plan
  • liaising with local EMS providers

AED programs are designed to maximize the value of your AED and meet all the recommendations from the Heart and Stroke Foundation, WorkSafeBC, and Health Canada.

AED Awareness

Of all the components that lead to a successful AED program deployment, and hopefully, to lives being saved when the need arises, awareness is the critical issue. By talking about sudden cardiac arrest and how it can be treated with the use of an AED, we are all doing our part with raising awareness of this critical issue in the community.

In contrast to the tragic SCA incident we mentioned in our first blog, take a look at the following video profiling an NHL player who suffered SCA on the ice, and who was saved thanks to an easily accessible AED and the fast actions of his teammates and an onlooker:

As you can see, SCA can happen to anyone, anywhere, at any time. You never know when your CPR skills and an AED will be needed.  Take a look around at the public places you often visit and see whether you can spot the AEDs.  You might need to know one day exactly where they’re located.

Iridia is working to raise awareness of locations of AEDs through its AEDs Everywhere campaign – a crowdsourcing campaign to map the location of AEDs all around the world. The AEDs Everywhere map allows anyone to upload the location of an AED.

Learn more about the program and how to participate.

Since 1998, Iridia has overseen the training and certification of over 30,000 individuals in the use of AEDs. We currently provide AED medical direction to over 300 clients including 140+ fire rescue services.

Part II in a series. View part I

Iridia Dresses Up for Jersey Day

Jersey Day

What is Jersey Day?

Friday, November 29 was a national day to show love and support for sport by wearing a jersey, team or club uniform to work. From municipal council chambers to office buildings and classrooms across the nation, the RBC Sports Day in Canada envisioned a sea of Canadians wearing their hearts on their sleeves on national Jersey Day.

This national celebration of sport, from grassroots to high-performance, was an opportunity for all Canadians to celebrate the power of sport, build community and national spirit, and facilitate healthy living.

Iridia on Jersey Day

When we first heard about Jersey Day, the Iridia team threw the gauntlet down and jumped right in – proudly showing our support. We’re passionate about our teamwork (it’s one of our core values after all), and we knew Jersey Day would offer a great opportunity to have fun and show some team spirit!

We were also very keen to support Jersey Day as it ties in to something very important to us – public access to defibrillation. There are millions of sports fans and players in Canada and every one of them is susceptible to Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA). We want to help raise awareness of SCA, and Jersey Day is one of the ways we’re spreading the word.

As of October 2013, Iridia has been working with the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada on a National PAD Program designed to bring Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) to arenas and recreational facilities across Canada.

AEDs

The National PAD Program

In April 2012, the Federal Government of Canada announced its commitment to saving lives with AEDs by increasing access to these life-saving devices in hockey arenas and recreation centres across Canada. The Heart and Stroke Foundation is leading this unprecedented initiative, representing the largest application process for AED funding in Canada’s history. The National PAD Program will help to improve the heart safety of communities across Canada with a targeted placement of 3,000 AEDs and the training of 30,000 people in how to use AEDs. Iridia is a key distributor of AEDs for this Program and we are proud to be involved with this life-saving initiative.

Using an AED is the only way to treat SCA, a killer of up to 40,000 Canadians each year. Unlike a heart attack, SCA does not discriminate. It can happen to anyone, anywhere and at any time. Survival depends on delivering a shock from an AED within the first few minutes of suffering an SCA. Coupling the early use of an AED with quality CPR can raise survival rates up to 75%.

AEDforMVP_logo_final_iridia

AED for MVP

Learn more about the National PAD Program and head over to AED for MVP – a site to help facilities around the country implement their AED programs. Having an AED will make you an MVP.

Learn why you need access to an AED here.

 

An Automated External Defibrillator (AED) Saves Another Life

With the recent launch of the province-wide Public Access Defibrillation (PAD) Program, news of an AED save in Toronto couldn’t have come at a better time. Since 2006, the public defibrillator program in Ontario, funded by the Heart and Stroke Foundation has saved 48 lives.

Public Access Defibrillation

Now it is our turn here in BC. With the PAD program underway, we can expect the same impact, as articulated by Health Minister Margaret MacDiarmid, we will be to “save hundreds of lives”. Indeed, with increased access to AEDS, each of the 2000 SCA deaths reported annually in BC has the potential to be avoided.

The team here at Iridia Medical is excited to play an ongoing role with the HSFBC and PAD program, we hope to see many lives saved.

Toronto AED Save

TORONTO, Feb. 13, 2013 /CNW/ – Once again, AEDs and CPR have proven their worth as a Toronto man is alive today thanks to the quick actions of bystanders. 

On Sunday, January 13, a 51-year-old Toronto-area resident Paul Poce was playing hockey at the Malvern Recreation Centre when he collapsed to the ice after suffering a cardiac arrest. His son Ben Poce, who also works as a paramedic for Peel Regional Paramedic Services, immediately rushed to his father’s side. Recognizing the signs and symptoms of cardiac arrest, Poce called out to his teammates to dial 9-1-1, instructed his friend Shawn Nichols to start chest compressions, while he retrieved the on-site AED. 

Read the full story

CPRAbout the Heart and Stroke Foundation:

The Heart and Stroke Foundation (heartandstroke.ca), a volunteer-based health charity, leads in eliminating heart disease and stroke, reducing their impact through the advancement of research and its application, the promotion of healthy living and advocacy.

You Don’t Need to be a Doctor… AED Facts

These days anyone can save a life. Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) make it possible for bystanders to perform life saving actions with little or no training. Voice prompts and simple instructions make AEDs incredibly easy to operate, giving any rescuer the chance to act.

For those of you who don’t know, an AED is a small machine that can analyze a heart rhythm. It can determine whether or not the heart rhythm is beating effectively, if not, the AED can deliver a shock that will likely restart the heart.  An AED will only advise the individual using the device to deliver a shock if the heart is in a rhythm which can be corrected by defibrillation.

AED Facts

Signs of cardiac arrest include: no breathing, no movement or response to initial rescue breaths, and no pulse. Often the only “cure” of sudden cardiac arrest is rapid defibrillation with an AED. 

AED Facts
http://www.heartandstroke.com

• In Canada, 35,000 to 45,000 people die of sudden cardiac arrest each year

• AEDs are safe, easy to use, and can be used effectively by trained medical and nonmedical individuals. Trained responders have effectively used AEDs in many public settings, including casinos, airport terminals, and airplanes. Trained laypersons can use AEDs safely and effectively.

• An AED is an efficient and effective means of achieving rapid defibrillation in both the out-of-hospital and in-hospital setting.

• Sudden cardiac arrest occurs with a frequency of roughly 1 per 1000 people 35 years of age or older per year.

• Any location that has 1000 adults over the age of 35 present per day during normal business hours (7.5 hours/day, 5 days per week, 250 days per year) can expect 1 incident of sudden cardiac arrest every 5 years.

• For every one minute delay in defibrillation, the survival rate of a cardiac arrest victim decreases by 7 to 10%. After more than 12 minutes of ventricular fibrillation, the survival rate of adults is less than 5%.

• Currently there is evidence to support a recommendation to use AEDs for children over the age of 1, but not for children under the age of 1.

• Across Canada, some provinces regulate the use of AEDs, while other provinces do not. Information about individual provincial regulations can be obtained from the provincial Heart and Stroke Foundation offices.
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With time being a major critical factor for surviving cardiac arrest, it is imperative that the public have widespread access and training to AED devices. Public Access Defibrillation (PAD) trials have demonstrated a doubling of survival rates (from 15% to 30%) in facilities with high likelihood and with trained staff always available.

Spread the word, AEDs = Lives Saved